Catcher in the rye setting analysis

Antonia is fourteen when we first see her; Jim Burden ten. She is an immigrant. He is an orphan. It is no surprise we encounter them first in motion on a train.

Catcher in the rye setting analysis

Salinger published in The novel details two days in the life of year-old Holden Caulfield after he has been expelled from prep school. He ends up exhausted and emotionally unstable. The events are related after the fact.

The story begins with Holden at Pencey Prep School on his way to the house of his history teacher, Spencer, so that he can say goodbye.

He reveals to the reader that he has been expelled for failing most of his classes. Having agreed, Holden writes about the baseball glove of his younger brother, Allie, who died of leukemia. This causes Holden to storm out and leave Pencey for New York City a few days earlier than planned for Christmas break.

Once he arrives in New York, he cannot go home, as his parents do not yet know that he has been expelled.

Catcher in the rye setting analysis

Instead, he rents a room at the Edmont Hotel, where he witnesses some sexually charged scenes through the windows of other rooms. When he gets back to the hotel, he orders a prostitute to his room, only to talk to her. This situation ends in him being punched in the stomach. The next morning, Holden calls Sally Hayes, an ex-girlfriend of his.

They spend the day together until Holden makes a rude remark and she leaves crying. Holden stays behind and gets drunk by himself. He sneaks in, still not prepared to face his parents, and finds his year-old sister, Phoebe. She is upset when she hears that Holden has failed out and accuses him of not liking anything.

He calls his former English teacher, Mr. Antolini, who tells Holden he can come stay at his apartment. He immediately excuses himself and heads to Grand Central Stationwhere he spends the rest of the night.

She arrives with a packed bag and insists on going with him. He tells her no and instead takes her to the zoo, where he watches her ride the carousel in the pouring rain. This is where the flashback ends.

Interpretation The Catcher in the Rye takes the loss of innocence as its primary concern. If they fall off, they fall off. Publication and initial reception The Caulfield family was one Salinger had already explored in a number of stories that had been published by different magazines.

Holden appeared in some of those stories, even narrating one, but he was not as richly fleshed out in them as he would be in The Catcher in the Rye. The novel, unlike the other stories of the Caulfield family, had difficulties getting published. Originally solicited by Harcourt, Brace and Company, the manuscript was rejected after the head of the trade division asked whether Holden was supposed to be crazy.

After Little, Brown bought the manuscript, Salinger showed it to The New Yorker, assuming that the magazine, which had published several of his short stories, would want to print excerpts from the novel.Catcher in the Rye Archetypal Analysis; Catcher in the Rye Archetypal Analysis.

Words Mar 29th, 16 Pages. INTRODUCTION Jerome David Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, is a work of fiction and a tragic-comedy. It is an interesting and controversial novel.

Catcher in the rye setting analysis

Catcher in the Rye Setting Analysis Words | 4 Pages. This list of important quotations from “Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger will help you work with the essay topics and thesis statements above by allowing you to support your claims.

How to Write Literary Analysis The Literary Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide. When you read for pleasure, your only goal is enjoyment. You might find yourself reading to get caught up in an exciting story, to learn about an interesting time or place, or just to pass time.

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